UNDERSTANDING HOW VOLTAGE & REGULATORS WORK

"How do I get my voltage up?"

1ST SCENARIO CATEGORY

People that have regulator set-points lower than they would like to see

  • They can be internally set to 13.8, external like Dodge or Jeep products that are also set to 13.8 but the computer is in the PCM. (Not to be confused with PCM regulators like GM has, the 2 pin ones that nobody likes)

  • They go into 5 or 6 different modes that all have different voltage set-points that range from 12-15'ish. The regulator set-point is the voltage limit. When voltage drops, the regulator can’t simply just raise it​. Voltage drops because there is not enough current to supply the load. This could mean either the alt doesn't have enough output at idle, which is very common these days with everyone wanting 370+ amp units that really don't have good output at idle, unless you idle high, like 750 or higher, which most cars don't

  • Or it could be that the alt is just too small for the job it's being asked to do, also very common with how big systems are now-a-days. So really, rather than calling it a "regulator" it should be called a "Limiter", because it doesn't really regulate, it limits

  • If you have voltage problems because the regulator set-point is too low, you can either get a regulator with a higher set-point OR get a VCM from XS Power. Scottie Johnson can definitely help you with that. I HIGHLY recommend the VCM over ANY external regulator out there

2ND SCENARIO CATEGORY

People with actual PCM controlled alternators that play with voltage all the time

  • In this case, you really need to go with a Non-PCM controlled regulator that you'll need to wire up if you want a constant set-point. If you have low voltage at idle... you either purchased the wrong amperage alternator for your car (too high for the case style and engine parameters of your vehicle), purchased a poorly designed alternator, or you may have a battery issue. either not fully charged or you may have a bad one

3RD SCENARIO CATEGORY

People that have an alternator that doesn't have enough current

  •  Whether it’s at idle or not enough max current, most of that I explained earlier. If you don't have Current, you CAN’T have Voltage. . .. no way around it

So, if you have voltage problems because the regulator set-point is too low... you can either get a regulator with a higher set-point or get a VCM from XS Power. Scottie Johnson can definitely help you with that... and I HIGHLY recommend the VCM over any external regulator out there

 

If you have low voltage at idle... you either purchased the wrong amperage alternator for your car (too high for the case style and engine parameters of your vehicle), purchased a poorly designed alternator, or you may have a battery issue. either not fully charged or you may have a bad one